Students and Plagiarism: Exploring the Disconnect Between Morals and Behavior


What are the motivations behind student plagiarism? Why do students cheat even when they believe that it's morally wrong? What are some of the ways in which students rationalize their sense of responsibility--and to what end or intended outcome?

This webcast explores the disconnect between student moral understanding and motivation by looking at the problem of plagiarism and cheating from the student perspective. Drawing from research based on survey data, we specifically address the drivers that prompt students' decision to plagiarize.

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Photo Jason StephensJason M. Stephens is a Sr. Lecturer in the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at The University of Auckland. Previously, Jason was an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut. His research focuses on academic motivation and moral development during adolescence. Jason is particularly interested in the problem of academic dishonesty and the disconnect between moral beliefs and behaviors related to cheating. He has co-authored two books: "Educating Citizens" and "Creating a Culture of Academic Integrity."

Photo Ray HuangRay Huang is the Customer Programs Manager at Turnitin. He regularly contributes to the Turnitin blog and newsletters, organizes user events, and oversees training resources. He was the primary survey developer and analyst for the instructor survey included in the Plagiarism Spectrum report.

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On-Demand Webcast

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